makingupachangingmind:

singletearintomilkwhilelookingintothemirror

makingupachangingmind:

singletearintomilkwhilelookingintothemirror

(Source: beyonce)

Is 'Strong Black Womanhood' Killing Our Sisters?

(Source: knowledgeequalsblackpower, via unphazedcat)

britticisms:

I was naive to believe we are concerned for each other - strangers and family alike - equally. I was naive to think that we are all strong in mind and body. I was naive to think of anyone but myself. I was naive to try when everything told me not to again and again.

For those who can’t sort out their bias list in exo:

baeby-byun:

era-of-kpop:

oh-eshun:

kyunqdoo:

click here and get your life sorted out

image

well fuck

image

I agree with mine

image

totally agree with mine~ oh yeah~ 

This actually worked though. Wow.

(via manynoonatears)

"Okay, I see you."

African American Proverb (via blackproverbs)

(via unphazedcat)

Today, I Might Stand Inside the Rain.

The man sitting at the entrance of this cafe looks like an unanswerable question? A declaratory statement with an inflection at the close? At any rate, I am in search of Kentiya once again, for the last time.

Read More

Lines in Late April

rabbit-light:

           for April Tyrrel, upon hearing the prognosis

April has been characteristically brief,
coming in on a promise, but somehow
always circling the point.
Taconic streams swollen by the melting mountains
push impatiently against matted leaves and fallen
branches that seem to belong somewhere else.
Nightfall is a gentle rushing on the forest floor
and the piercing laughter of predators that slip through shadows
and edge along the lake where moonlight descends.
One day, April is icy, grasping and resolute.
Another time, the impudent, golden reach of forsythia
arches against the likelihood across gunmetal gray skies.
April ice can slip in unexpectedly with the sinking sun
to swallow tender sprouts like a crusty tumor.
Ice lays waste to fragile shoots on old wood.
In the end, the ice in April is every bit as fragile
as those new buds setting out a plan for summer.
These gnarled bones of birches have lasted another winter.

(Source: rattle.com)

atane:

“I’ve never been to Africa, but I feel like I have this deep affinity for it,” Ms. Hanley Mellon said. “I’ve read every Hemingway, we collect Peter Beard, I’ve watched ‘Out of Africa.’ It touches your soul to visit and smell the smells, and you can’t recreate the experience without immersing yourself.”
That quote is not a joke, and it’s not taken out of context. That is a real. The couple in the picture are Matthew Mellon and Nicole Hanley Mellon.
You can read the article where the quote comes from in the NY Times.
H/T Africa is a Country

atane:

“I’ve never been to Africa, but I feel like I have this deep affinity for it,” Ms. Hanley Mellon said. “I’ve read every Hemingway, we collect Peter Beard, I’ve watched ‘Out of Africa.’ It touches your soul to visit and smell the smells, and you can’t recreate the experience without immersing yourself.”

That quote is not a joke, and it’s not taken out of context. That is a real. The couple in the picture are Matthew Mellon and Nicole Hanley Mellon.

You can read the article where the quote comes from in the NY Times.

H/T Africa is a Country

humansofnewyork:

"I’m giving a presentation tomorrow on the experience of African American males growing up in America.""What’s the thesis?""Hundreds of interviews have been conducted, and we’ve found that not only do most African American males fail to acknowledge institutional racism, they mainly tend to blame themselves for their failures. They say things like they didn’t work hard enough, or made too many mistakes. They don’t understand that they weren’t afforded the same opportunities."

humansofnewyork:

"I’m giving a presentation tomorrow on the experience of African American males growing up in America."
"What’s the thesis?"
"Hundreds of interviews have been conducted, and we’ve found that not only do most African American males fail to acknowledge institutional racism, they mainly tend to blame themselves for their failures. They say things like they didn’t work hard enough, or made too many mistakes. They don’t understand that they weren’t afforded the same opportunities."